HSE AND OIL & GAS EMPLOYMENT TRAINING – CONFINED SPACE

CONFINED SPACE

Confined space could mean or be attributed to any of the following:

poorly ventilated space or closed apartment with a narrow single entry point or a space with single(narrow) entry point which have been closed for a long period of time.

CHARACTERISTICS

  1. It is not originally designed for human occupancy
  2. It has unfavorable natural ventilation
  3. limited openings for entry and exit
  4. Potentially hazardous

TYPES OF CONFINED SPACE

Confined spaces exist in many settings but are especially common in storage and transportation facilities.

Example of confined space includes:

Pipelines, tunnels, storage Tanks, vessels, sub-cellars, cold storage lockers, hoppers e.t.c

Confined space can be below or above the ground.

A confined space despite its name is not necessarily small.

NATURE OF CONFINED SPACE

Fatal and serious accidents have regularly occurred to workers in confined space as a result of negligence or ignorance of the risk associated with it. The high risk and hazard if not identified and controlled can pose a lot of challenge to the labor force entering it.it is therefore important to identify the hazards and control the risk associated with working in a confined space by the implementation of a confined space hazard assessment and control program.

HAZARDS OF CONFINED SPACE

Confined space hazards can be divided into two major categories:

  1. Atmospheric hazards (dangerous air)
  2. Physical hazards

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HSE AND OIL&GAS EMPLOYMENT TRAINING-UNSAFE ACT AUDIT

UNSAFE  ACT AUDIT

Definition

Unsafe act audit is a procedure design which enables an organization to identify unsafe practices of employees in the organization.

Unsafe act audits therefore enables management to sense the safety climate in the worksite and take appropriate measures to prevent accidents and associated injuries. Unsafe Acts audits are conducted mainly by supervisory staff.

Howwever,non-supervisory  personel may also be involved whenever the need arises.

It is about observing actions of people that are unsafe that may ultimately lead to accident.

Objectives of Unsafe Act Auditing

  • It Increases safety awareness: This will reduce significantly the potentials for accidents in the individual’s working habits
  • Raise standard: By Improving or reaffirming accepted standards of safety
  • Promote communication and understanding ,and ensure effective use of the resources of the business
  • It encourages teamwork as regards safety

SAFETY PRINCIPLES

  • The major principle in safety is the principle that all accidents is preventable
  • Safety is everyone’s business
  • Safety is everyone’s responsibility
  • Safety training is an essential element for safe workplace practice
  • Safe work practices should be re-inforced and all unsafe acts and unsafe condition must be corrected promptly
  • It is essential to investigate all accident and deduce lessons to prevent re-occurrence
  • Off-the-job safety training is as important as on the job training.
  • If its not safe,it is not right
  • Safety audits are essential tools in pro-active safety approach to accident prevention

Therefore, It is reasonable to observe people at work so as to take necessary remedial actions to prevent accident. One of the tools we can use is unsafe Act auditing. Safety training observation program card(stop cards) helps you to put these principles into action.

For more details:

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HSE AND OIL&GAS EMPLOYMENT TRAINING UPDATE

Working in an oil and gas industry/Construction and marine can make you have better income.
But proper certification is required to achieve that feat.
Certifications in Health safety and environment is also needed.
International Certifications such World safety organization helps you to stand a better chance.

On the 31st of july 2017,training would commence in the following courses:
HSE Level 1
HSE Level 2
HSE Level 3
OIL and Gas document Control
Visit www.deslogenergy.com/hsetraining for more details
Or Call our Hotlines:
09033177849
08137477086
07033847973
07035612321

You may also click here  to get related info

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OIL AND GAS EMPLOYMENT TRAINING UPDATE

Upcoming July 24th HSE(Final Batch) training holds in Lagos and Port-harcourt.
 
Venue:
Lagos: No. 2 Sanyaolu street by Oregun bus stop, Oregun, Ikeja, Lagos.
 
Port-Harcourt:
No. 321 PH/Aba Expressway, Opposite Samsung, Rumuokwurusi, Port Harcourt,Rivers State.
 
Course Content:
HSE Level 1,2,3.
Oil & Gas Document Control
Medic First-Aid
 
Course Fees:
Registration:=N=5,000
Course: =N= 50,000
Lunch & Hard Copy Materials
 
Visit www.deslogenergy.com/hsetraining
Or Call Our Hotlines:
07033847973
08137477086
08131883143
08138663697
 
 
Related Links:
 

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT/CLOTHING(OIL AND GAS,HSE & EMPLOYMENT TRAINING)

PERSONAL PROTECTIVE EQUIPMENT (PPE)/PERSONAL PROTECTIVE CLOTHING PPC
The factory Act of 1990 made it mandatory for PPE/PPC to be provided for workers of company/factory. This PPE/PPC isthe last line of defense against accident when hazards cannot be eliminated through engineering, procedure and administrative control.
What is PPE?: These are pieces of gadgets, apparels, and equipment selected after proper job hazards analysis (JHA) that are capable of protecting the worker wearing it against identified risk.
Note: PPE do not prevent accident or hazard but they only reduce the impact of accident or effect of hazard.
TYPES OF PPE’s & PPC’s:
some common PPE’s/PPC’s in use in our industry today are:
 
Coveralls,Handhats,Handgloves,Safety boots,Raincoats..e.t.c.
WHY THE USE OF PPE’S
1. It is a legal requirement
2. Economic wisdom
3. Moral obligation
4. It saves life
REASONS FOR NOT USING PPE
1. Discomfort due to weather
2. Ignorance
3. PPE’S not fashionable
4. Cost of PPE’s
5. Exposure of grade workers.
 
SELECTING OF PPE/PPC
 
All PPE (equipment/clothing) should be of safe design and construction, and should be maintained in a clean and reliable fashion. Employers should take the fit and comfort of PPE into consideration when selecting appropriate items for their work place. PPE that fits well and is comfortable to wear will encourage employee use them.
 
Source:www.deslogenergy.com
 
Related Links:
 
http://deslogenergy.com/post/personal-protective-equipment-clothing-oil-and-gas-hse—employment-training-
 
https://deslogenergyblog.blogspot.com.ng/2017/07/personal-protective-equipmentclothingoi.html

OIL AND GAS/HSE EMPLOYMENT TRAINING-CHEMICAL SAFETY

                                                              Chemical safety

Safely managing the chemicals in your workplace is good for business and it is good for everyone!

It will improve your employees’ safety and health. It will potentially introduce cost savings, through

more effective work practices such as correct storage, handling, use and disposal procedures.

Potential harm to the environment will also be reduced.

This chemical safety guide is intended for all scale of businesses. In particular, it provides guidance for

completing your chemical risk assessment.

This guide will help you:

Create a complete list of the chemicals in your workplace.

Know where they are located, how much you have, how you are using them and who is

potentially exposed to them.

Know about the risks they pose.

Check whether the necessary controls are in place.

Identify corrective actions to be taken where controls are lacking.

1.1 Chemical safety: Key duties of employers and employees

There are key duties for employers and employees under the relevant health and safety legislation

Employers are required to:

Determine which hazardous substances are present in the workplace.

Assess the risks to employees and others from the presence of these hazardous

Substances.

Prevent or control exposure to the hazardous substances to as low as is reasonably practicable.

Have arrangements in place to deal with accidents, incidents and emergencies.

Provide information, training and consultation to employees.

Make available health surveillance to employees.

Employees also have duties. They must:

Co-operate with their employer e.g. follow procedures.

Make full and proper use of control measures e.g. using extract ventilation where provided, and report any defects.

Report any defects in plant/ equipment immediately to the employer as appropriate.

Report any accident or incident which may have resulted in the release of a dangerous chemical/substance into the workplace.

1.3  Getting started with chemical safety

In most cases you will be able to manage your chemical safety in-house. You will be familiar with the types of chemicals involved and the type of work activities in which these chemicals are used. In addition, your employees will have experience and knowledge that you can use when deciding on the precautions you are going to take.

You will probably already have precautions in place. You are now checking if these are sufficient and if you need to take further steps to protect people. Small or low-risk businesses will find it straight forward to identify their chemical hazards and put in place appropriate control measures. Larger businesses, and particularly those working in high-risk sectors, may need more resources and competency to manage their chemical safety.

It is important to remember – if you are unsure of any aspect of managing chemicals safely in your workplace, you should seek help from a competent person.

This guide is intended to help you complete a risk assessment for the chemicals you use in your workplace. A chemical risk assessment follows the same steps as a risk assessment for

any other hazards in your workplace. There are three basic steps:

Identify the hazard:

This involves identifying the chemicals you have in your workplace and the hazards associated with them.

Assess the risk:

This involves assessing the risk from chemicals or processes in your workplace.

Control the exposure:

This involves considering the various recognized control measures to eliminate or reduce the risk. Identify hazards Assess the risks

Terms you need to know

Here are some terms that relate to chemical risk assessment.

What this means to you

Hazard: A hazard is anything that has the potential to cause harm, in terms of

Injury, ill-health or damage to the environment. For example, working with dangerous chemicals or processes which give rise to dusts or fumes

Risk: Risk is the chance (e.g. high, medium or low) that a person or the environment will be harmed by the hazard. It also considers how severe the harm or ill-health could be.

Likelihood: Likelihood is a measure of how likely it is that an accident or illhealth

could happen. When people are working and managing their chemicals safely there is less chance that an accident or ill-health will occur.

Severity /

Consequence: Severity is a measure of how serious the injury, ill-health or damage to the environment could be as a consequence of unsafe working with chemicals

Control measure: Control measures are the steps you are going to take to remove

Chemical hazards or at least reduce exposure to a low level.

Safety data sheet (SDS): A safety data sheet (SDS) is a document that must be provided to you with all hazardous chemicals. It provides useful information on the chemical hazards, advice on safe handling, use and storage, and the emergency measures to be followed in case of an accident.

Label: All chemicals should be supplied with a label on the container which clearly identifies the chemical and its hazards.

CAS number: This is a unique identifying number which is assigned to each chemical. Where you encounter more than one chemical or trade name for the same chemical, you can use this number to definitively identify the chemical.

Occupational exposure limit value (OELV): This is a concentration of a chemical in workplace air to which most people can be exposed without experiencing harmful effects.

Chemical inventory: This is a list of all the chemicals you have in your workplace.

Source:www.deslogenergy.com

OIL AND GAS/HSE EMPLOYMENT TRAINING-SAFETY LIFTING OPERATIONS

Introduction
Lifting and hoisting operations are one of the major causes of fatalities and serious incidents in global Exploration and Production (E&P) activities. Every type of lift has a set of risks that need to be managed if the lift is to be undertaken in a safe and efficient manner.
Despite the vast number of regulations, standards and guidelines that apply to lifting, incidents continue to occur. To give the E&P industry a clear focus on this issue, the International Association of Oil & Gas Producers (OGP) Safety Committee Task Force on Lifting and Hoisting has developed this Recommended Practice (RP) document. This RP is based on current experience and best practice for preventing fatalities and serious incidents.
It is the E&P industry’s expectation that all companies conducting lifting activities have a management system that includes specific procedures based on a full assessment of the risks and control measures required.
The intent of this manual is to bring about a significant reduction in lifting incidents in the workplace by highlighting the essential principles of safe lifting and encouraging their strict application to safe lifting operations.
It is recommended that this guidance be applied to all mechanical lifting and hoisting activities in the E&P industry, except:
Drilling crown block, travelling block and top drive operations;
Goods and personnel elevators;
Ship anchor handling, marine towing, and routine ship operations not directly associated with E&P activities (e.g., ship maintenance);
Earthmoving equipment and operations;
Tree cutting & associated movement of lumber;
Helicopter lifting operations;
Fall protection and rope access equipment;
Manual handling.
The term lifting is used throughout this document to describe all types of lifting and hoisting.
PLANNING
 A lift plan is required for every lift. If the lift deviates from the plan, make safe and stop the job.
 Hazard identification and risk assessment are an integral part of planning a lift.
 An assessment of the lift and determination of the lift method, equipment and number of people required are critical to planning of the lift.
Lift Categorization
To ensure that suitable controls are applied, lifting operations shall be categorized according to the level of risk and complexity.
Lift Plans
All lifting operations shall have a lift plan supported by an analysis of the hazards and risks. Lift plans may be separate documents or can be part of other documents. The detail required is related to the risk and complexity of the lift.
Frequent or routine tasks may only require a generic lift plan supported by an onsite risk assessment and team briefing whereas other lifts may need significant engineering design effort. Generic lift plans may be appropriate for a series of similar or routine lifts within specified limits but shall be formally reviewed and re-issued periodically.
The lift plan shall clearly address, but not be limited to, the following:
 The type and number of personnel required, their specific roles and competences, and how they will be briefed;
 The nature and weight of the load and lifting points;
 Pick up and set down points and constraints such as space and stacking;
 Equipment required and certification checks;
 Step-by-step instructions;
 Communication methods to be used;
 An assessment of whether tag lines should be used, their hazards and limitations.
 Load integrity check;
 Load charts for generic lift plans and for heavy or complex lifts;
 Restrictions on the lift such as weather, light, sea state, etc.;
 Whether Permit to Work procedures are applicable;
 Emergency and rescue plans;
 Access and egress for slinging and un-slinging the load;
 Simultaneous, conflicting or nearby operations or work;
Approval of Lift Plans
All lift plans shall be reviewed and approved by a competent person. The rigor of review shall be determined by the category of lift, which may require a qualified specialist engineer.
Changes to Lift Plans
Any change to a plan shall be approved as if it were a new plan.
CONTROL
 One person in the lift team shall be designated as the person in charge of the lifting operation (referred to as PIC).
 The PIC shall review the lift plan and ensure that the required controls are in place and the lift is carried out following the plan.
 The PIC ensures that the lift team has tested and understood visual or radio communications prior to the lift.
 All personnel involved in the lifting operation shall have their individual responsibilities clearly allocated.
 All people shall be kept clear of overhead loads and areas of potential impact.
 Manual load handling shall not be used to stop a swinging load and shall only be performed below shoulder height.
Person in Charge (PIC)
The PIC has operational control of the lift. The PIC:
 Is designated as being in charge of coordinating, controlling and executing the lift;
 Reviews the lift plan and ensures that the required controls are in place;
 Ensures that the lifting equipment is inspected and appropriate for use;
 Checks that load integrity and stability is satisfactory;
 Ensures that people involved are competent for performing their task, aware of the task and procedures to be followed, and aware of their responsibilities;
 Briefs people involved in or affected by the lift;
 Ensures the lift is carried out following the plan. Suspends the lift if changes or conditions (e.g., wind) occur that would cause a deviation from the plan;
 Monitors the performance of all involved personnel to ensure that adequate standards of performance are maintained;
 Manages any special issues such as language barriers and new/inexperienced staff;
 Checks that there is no deviation from standards for routine lifts;
 Shall allow for concurrent or simultaneous operations that may affect or be affected by the lift, e.g., helicopter operations, ballast control, other cranes.
Legal Accountability
The PIC is not necessarily the same as the person with legal accountability.
Conducting the Lifting Operation
The PIC shall ensure that lifting operations are conducted in strict accordance with the approved lift plan. Any variation from the agreed lift plan shall result in the job being made safe, stopped and reassessed to ensure continued safe operation.
The following are critical practices in conducting the lifting operation:
 The lifting appliance operator shall obey an emergency stop signal at all times, no matter who gives it.
 The load to be lifted shall be confirmed as within the rated capacity of the lifting equipment and attached by means of suitable lifting accessories.
 The operator of the lifting appliance shall not leave the operating controls while the load is suspended.
 Personnel shall not undertake more than one task at a time, e.g. the signaler shall not handle loads and signal at the same time.
 All personnel and third parties shall be kept out of any area where they might be struck or crushed by a load or lifting equipment if it swings, shifts or falls. No one shall stand or work directly below a load. Physical barriers may be required for this.
 Operators shall never move a load directly over people.
 Personnel shall have an escape route in case of an unexpected movement of the load or equipment.
Human Factors
Human factors are critical in safe lifting. People can make mistakes and may break rules. This shall be addressed in planning and controlling lifting operations. Important human factors in lifting are culture/working environment, people, facilities/equipment and management system.
Communication
Before starting lifting operations the person in charge will hold a pre-job meeting to explain the lift plan to everybody in the lift team, confirm their
understanding of the plan and the hazards involved. Particular attention needs to be placed on proving the effectiveness of communications for blind lifts.
When lifting operations need to be controlled by signals, a designated signal person (signaler) shall be assigned. Signals between the lifting appliance operator and the signaler (sometimes referred to as Banksman or Flagman) shall be discernable – audibly or visually – at all times. When using radio communication, continuous verbal instruction shall be used. The operator shall stop whenever there is no clearly understood signal.
The PIC and the designated signal person shall be made known to the lift team and to personnel in the proximity to the lift. The signaler shall be clearly identified, preferably by distinctive clothing.
In order to facilitate good communication, it is important that personnel involved in the lifting operation are not distracted. With this in mind, the use of mobile phones or other devices unrelated to the lift should be restricted.
Roles and responsibilities
Site Manager:
 Has overall responsibility for the site and for applying safety management systems;
 Authorizes or designates a PIC who has the required competence and will be positioned on site to control the lift safely;
 Authorizes or designates lifting equipment operators.
Signaler:
Where required, is designated by the PIC;
 Is the sole signaler at any given time;
 Has direct line of sight of the load;
 Adheres to a clear process, including confirmation of handover by PIC and operator, if a handover to another signaler is required;
 Does not handle rigging duties simultaneously.
Lifting Appliance Operator:
 Shall have authorization to use the equipment;
 Is responsible for pre-use inspection of the lifting appliance;
 Is responsible for using the equipment properly.
All Involved Personnel:
 Shall understand their role and be competent to do it.
 Shall inform the PIC if conditions change or if there are safety concerns during the lift.
Slinger/Load Handler:
Works under the direction of the PIC to (un)sling and handle loads.
COMPETENCE
 All persons involved in planning/performing lifting and maintaining lifting equipment shall be trained and competent for their role.
 Refresher training and periodic assessment is necessary to assure competence.
The management system shall define the standards required for critical roles and the process for assuring the competence of those involved in planning and executing lifting operations. Generally, to be regarded as competent a person shall have received the necessary training and subsequently demonstrated their ability to perform at the required level in the field. The system shall allow the PIC to easily confirm personnel competence. To facilitate this, records of competence shall be available on site, and if practicable on the person.
Periodic assessment (preferably every two years, but normally not longer than four years) and refresher training shall be conducted as necessary to ensure the required level of performance is maintained.
Equipment specific training will be necessary for certain operations.
Additional considerations are:
 Formal certification shall always comply with legislative and management system requirements;
 When technical authorities or advisors are used, their roles shall be defined in the management system and they shall have the required level of competence and access to specialist advice;
 Companies should consider the relevance and benefits of simulator training
Terminology
Lifting and hoisting operations are one of the major causes of fatalities and serious incidents in global Exploration and Production (E&P) activities. Every type of lift has a set of risks that need to be managed if the lift is to be undertaken in a safe and efficient manner.
Despite the vast number of regulations, standards and guidelines that apply to lifting, incidents continue to occur. To give the E&P industry a clear focus on this issue, the International Association of Oil & Gas Producers (OGP) Safety Committee Task Force on Lifting and Hoisting has developed this Recommended Practice (RP) document. This RP is based on current experience and best practice for preventing fatalities and serious incidents.
It is the E&P industry’s expectation that all companies conducting lifting activities have a management system that includes specific procedures based on a full assessment of the risks and control measures required.
The intent of this manual is to bring about a significant reduction in lifting incidents in the workplace by highlighting the essential principles of safe lifting and encouraging their strict application to safe lifting operations.
It is recommended that this guidance be applied to all mechanical lifting and hoisting activities in the E&P industry, except:
Drilling crown block, travelling block and top drive operations;
Goods and personnel elevators;
Ship anchor handling, marine towing, and routine ship operations not directly associated with E&P activities (e.g., ship maintenance);
Earth-moving equipment and operations;
Tree cutting & associated movement of lumber;
Helicopter lifting operations;
Fall protection and rope access equipment;
Manual handling.
The term lifting is used throughout this document to describe all types of lifting and hoisting.
PLANNING
A lift plan is required for every lift. If the lift deviates from the plan, make safe and stop the job.
Hazard identification and risk assessment are an integral part of planning a lift.
An assessment of the lift and determination of the lift method, equipment and number of people required are critical to planning of the lift.
Lift Categorization
To ensure that suitable controls are applied, lifting operations shall be categorized according to the level of risk and complexity.
Lift Plans
All lifting operations shall have a lift plan supported by an analysis of the hazards and risks. Lift plans may be separate documents or can be part of other documents. The detail required is related to the risk and complexity of the lift.
Frequent or routine tasks may only require a generic lift plan supported by an onsite risk assessment and team briefing whereas other lifts may need significant engineering design effort. Generic lift plans may be appropriate for a series of similar or routine lifts within specified limits but shall be formally reviewed and re-issued periodically.
The lift plan shall clearly address, but not be limited to, the following:
The type and number of personnel required, their specific roles and competences, and how they will be briefed;
The nature and weight of the load and lifting points;
Pick up and set down points and constraints such as space and stacking;
Equipment required and certification checks;
Step-by-step instructions;
Communication methods to be used;
An assessment of whether tag lines should be used, their hazards and limitations.
Load integrity check;
Load charts for generic lift plans and for heavy or complex lifts;
Restrictions on the lift such as weather, light, sea state, etc.;
Whether Permit to Work procedures are applicable;
Emergency and rescue plans;
Access and egress for slinging and un-slinging the load;
Simultaneous, conflicting or nearby operations or work;
Approval of Lift Plans
All lift plans shall be reviewed and approved by a competent person. The rigor of review shall be determined by the category of lift, which may require a qualified specialist engineer.
Changes to Lift Plans
Any change to a plan shall be approved as if it were a new plan.
CONTROL
One person in the lift team shall be designated as the person in charge of the lifting operation (referred to as PIC).
The PIC shall review the lift plan and ensure that the required controls are in place and the lift is carried out following the plan.
The PIC ensures that the lift team has tested and understood visual or radio communications prior to the lift.
All personnel involved in the lifting operation shall have their individual responsibilities clearly allocated.
All people shall be kept clear of overhead loads and areas of potential impact.
Manual load handling shall not be used to stop a swinging load and shall only be performed below shoulder height.
Person in Charge (PIC)
The PIC has operational control of the lift. The PIC:
Is designated as being in charge of coordinating, controlling and executing the lift;
Reviews the lift plan and ensures that the required controls are in place;
Ensures that the lifting equipment is inspected and appropriate for use;
Checks that load integrity and stability is satisfactory;
Ensures that people involved are competent for performing their task, aware of the task and procedures to be followed, and aware of their responsibilities;
Briefs people involved in or affected by the lift;
Ensures the lift is carried out following the plan. Suspends the lift if changes or conditions (e.g., wind) occur that would cause a deviation from the plan;
Monitors the performance of all involved personnel to ensure that adequate standards of performance are maintained;
Manages any special issues such as language barriers and new/inexperienced staff;
Checks that there is no deviation from standards for routine lifts;
Shall allow for concurrent or simultaneous operations that may affect or be affected by the lift, e.g., helicopter operations, ballast control, other cranes.
Legal Accountability
The PIC is not necessarily the same as the person with legal accountability.
Conducting the Lifting Operation
The PIC shall ensure that lifting operations are conducted in strict accordance with the approved lift plan. Any variation from the agreed lift plan shall result in the job being made safe, stopped and reassessed to ensure continued safe operation.
The following are critical practices in conducting the lifting operation:
The lifting appliance operator shall obey an emergency stop signal at all times, no matter who gives it.
The load to be lifted shall be confirmed as within the rated capacity of the lifting equipment and attached by means of suitable lifting accessories.
The operator of the lifting appliance shall not leave the operating controls while the load is suspended.
Personnel shall not undertake more than one task at a time, e.g. the signaler shall not handle loads and signal at the same time.
All personnel and third parties shall be kept out of any area where they might be struck or crushed by a load or lifting equipment if it swings, shifts or falls. No one shall stand or work directly below a load. Physical barriers may be required for this.
Operators shall never move a load directly over people.
Personnel shall have an escape route in case of an unexpected movement of the load or equipment.
Human Factors
Human factors are critical in safe lifting. People can make mistakes and may break rules. This shall be addressed in planning and controlling lifting operations. Important human factors in lifting are culture/working environment, people, facilities/equipment and management system.
Communication
Before starting lifting operations the person in charge will hold a pre-job meeting to explain the lift plan to everybody in the lift team, confirm their
understanding of the plan and the hazards involved. Particular attention needs to be placed on proving the effectiveness of communications for blind lifts.
When lifting operations need to be controlled by signals, a designated signal person (signaler) shall be assigned. Signals between the lifting appliance operator and the signaler (sometimes referred to as Banksman or Flagman) shall be discernable – audibly or visually – at all times. When using radio communication, continuous verbal instruction shall be used. The operator shall stop whenever there is no clearly understood signal.
The PIC and the designated signal person shall be made known to the lift team and to personnel in the proximity to the lift. The signaler shall be clearly identified, preferably by distinctive clothing.
In order to facilitate good communication, it is important that personnel involved in the lifting operation are not distracted. With this in mind, the use of mobile phones or other devices unrelated to the lift should be restricted.
Roles and responsibilities
Site Manager:
Has overall responsibility for the site and for applying safety management systems;
Authorizes or designates a PIC who has the required competence and will be positioned on site to control the lift safely;
Authorizes or designates lifting equipment operators.
Signaler:
Where required, is designated by the PIC;
Is the sole signaler at any given time;
Has direct line of sight of the load;
Adheres to a clear process, including confirmation of handover by PIC and operator, if a handover to another signaler is required;
Does not handle rigging duties simultaneously.
Lifting Appliance Operator:
Shall have authorization to use the equipment;
Is responsible for pre-use inspection of the lifting appliance;
Is responsible for using the equipment properly.
All Involved Personnel:
Shall understand their role and be competent to do it.
Shall inform the PIC if conditions change or if there are safety concerns during the lift.
Slinger/Load Handler:
Works under the direction of the PIC to (un)sling and handle loads.
COMPETENCE
All persons involved in planning/performing lifting and maintaining lifting equipment shall be trained and competent for their role.
Refresher training and periodic assessment is necessary to assure competence.
The management system shall define the standards required for critical roles and the process for assuring the competence of those involved in planning and executing lifting operations. Generally, to be regarded as competent a person shall have received the necessary training and subsequently demonstrated their ability to perform at the required level in the field. The system shall allow the PIC to easily confirm personnel competence. To facilitate this, records of competence shall be available on site, and if practicable on the person.
Periodic assessment (preferably every two years, but normally not longer than four years) and refresher training shall be conducted as necessary to ensure the required level of performance is maintained.
Equipment specific training will be necessary for certain operations.
Additional considerations are:
Formal certification shall always comply with legislative and management system requirements;
When technical authorities or advisors are used, their roles shall be defined in the management system and they shall have the required level of competence and access to specialist advice;

OIL AND GAS/HSE EMPLOYMENT TRAINING-ROUSTABOUTS

INTRODUCTION

WHO ARE ROUSTABOUTS?

1. They are considered as skill apprentices in a literal language.

2. Roustabouts are often called the oil and gas career new babes

THE ROUSTABOUT

ü It’s the entering level into the oil and gas career.

WORK NATURE

1. Roustabouts are helpers in the oil and gas stand.

2. It’s basically masculine manly because sometimes it’s tasking and require enough strength to work.

WHO DO THEY HELP?

1. The radio operator’s

2. The drillers

3. The riggers

4. The derrick men

5. The roughnecks

6. The Welders

7. The foremen

8. The filters

WHAT DO THEY HELP WITH?

1. Painting

2. Lifting, Carrying tools and equipments

3. Cleaning Spills and general housekeeping

4. Control Cranes (in special occasions)

5. Loading and unloading

6. Safety Monitoring

7. Equipment Washing, Oiling and Maintaining

8. Assisting the drillers

ROUSTABOUT AN ENTRY LEVEL

1. It’s not a profession.

2. It’s a short term position however it requires the employee to have learnt any special skill before he or she is to be promoted.

3. In most cases candidates are required to possess required certification before being employed.

ROUSTABOUT QUALIFICATION REQUIREMENT

1. Special Certification in Roustabout.

2. Knowledge and certification in Housekeeping.

3. Knowledge and certification in manual Handling.

4. Certification in Confine space safety

MANUAL HANDLING

Any activity required of a person to use any part of their muscular or skeletal system in their interactions with their work environment.

NOTE: Because the roustabout personnel’s are always involved with manual tasks, then it’s important to know how to do manual handling correctly.

1. CARRYING

When is carrying done wrongly?

ü When it has heavy impact on the carrier’s muscles or skeletal system.

When is carrying done correctly?

ü When a machine is use to carry load instead.

ü When a lighter load is carried or when more hands are added.

2. LIFTING

When is Lifting done wrongly?

ü When the lifter bends to use his skeletal system.

Note: the danger is doing lifting wrongly is fracture or dislocation to any of the skeletal parts.

When is Lifting done Correctly?

ü When the lifter squats with his back erect and his knees bend as show in picture above.

3. STRIKING

When is Striking done wrongly?

ü When it has heavy impact on the strikers muscles or skeletal system and when it’s done for long time.

When is Striking done Correctly?

ü When its done lightly and in a short period of time.

ü When you engage the use of the right machines.

4. PUSHING

When is Pushing done wrongly?

ü When the pusher’s skeletal system is involved and or when the pusher’s involves too much of his muscles.

When is Pushing done Correctly?

ü When it’s done lightly and or the pusher engages the right machines to push to his destination.

Note:

ü Wrong handling of manual task leads to MSD (musculoskeletal disorder) injuries.

ü Poor manual handlings contribute to 30% of workplace injuries.

Examples of MSD

1. Strains of ligaments

2. Strains of muscles or tendons

3. Injuries to the spine, joints, bones or nerves

4. Abdominal hernias.

WARNING

70% of the roustabout’s work involves manual handling, its highly advisable that intending candidate take it open himself to do manual tasks in the right way.

More so, right Manual handling is what recruiters want to watch out for.

CHAPTER ONE

THE ROUSTABOUT AND THE CRANE

TYPES OF CRANE

1. MOBILE

2. HYDROULIC

3. OVERHEAD

4. GANTRY

5. TOWER

OFFSHORE CRANES

MOBILE MOUNTED CRANE

WORKSHOP OVERHEAD CRANE

CRANE BOOM

An inclined spar, strut, or other long member supports the hoisting tackle.

CRANE HOIST

Used in Lifting and lowering of load.

Note:

No thought, Cranes help correct lots of manual handling problems but cranes themselves can be dangerous if proper safety precautions are not apply.

MAJOR SAFETY ISSUES WITH CRANES

1. Contact with power lines

2. Over Turns

3. Falls

4. Mechanical failures

5. Boom collapse

6. Load Drops

HOW DO ACCIDENTS OCCUR

1. INSTABILITY: unsecured load, load capacity exceeded, or ground not level or too soft.

2. LACK OF COMMUNICATION: the point of operation is a distance from the crane operator or not in full view of the operator.

3. LACK OF TRAINING

4. INADEQUATE MAINTENANCE OR INSPECTION

SOLUTIONS

PLAINING BEFORE STARTUP

1. Level the crane and ensure support surface is firm and able to support the load.

2. Know the basic crane capacities, limitations, and job site restrictions, such as the location of power lines, unstable soil, or high winds.

3. Make other personnel aware of hoisting activities.

4. Barricade areas within swing radius.

5. Ensure proper maintenance and inspections.

SAFETY TIPS

1. POWER LINES

Stay Clear of Power lines.

2. USE LADDER

Use ladders to get to the upper portion of the cab.

3. DON’T STAND UNDER SUSPENDED LOADS.

CRANE INSPECTION

What to inspect

1. Correct air pressure and no leaks

2. Tires properly inflated

3. Clearance for tail swing

4. Wire rope wear

5. Physical damage to crane

6. Loose or missing hardware, nuts, or bolts

7. Fluid leaks

STANDARD HAND SIGNAL

STANDARD CRANE HAND SIGNAL

Standard crane hand signal

1. Signaling and effectively communicating with the crane operators is almost an everyday routine for the roustabout personnel, we can’t over emphasis how important sign-communication is in a very noisy working environment most especially for heavy equipment operators.

2. Seeing how important unify communication is, world regulatory body ANSI came up with standards for hand signals for crane operators and those who wants to communicate with them.

TO SIGNAL A CRANE

The signal person (Roustabout) assigned to the crane shall:

1. Be positioned in full view of the operator and if using hand signals close enough for the signals to be seen clearly. The signal persons position must give him/her a full view of the load and equipment at all times without creating a hazard of being struck by the crane and/or load.

2. Responsible for the public and all (unauthorized personnel outside of the crane’s operating radius).

3. Be in constant communication with the operator at all times with either the standard hand signals as required in accordance with ANSI B30.5 or by direct radio communication.

4. Direct the load so that it never passes over anyone.

5. It is recommended that the signal person wear highly visible gloves (day-glow orange, yellow or white) to distinguish him/herself from other personnel and make the signals clearer.

Source:www.deslogenergy.com

OIL AND GAS EMPLOYMENT TRAINING-FIRST AID

OIL AND GAS EMPLOYMENT TRAINING

FIRST AID

When we talk of first aid, we mean the skilled emergency application of accepted principles of treatment on the occurrence of injury or in the case of illness using facilities or materials available at the time and venue of the accident.

DEFINITION

First aid is the immediate temporary treatment given or carried out in case of emergency, sudden illness or accident prior to the arrival of a doctor/medical personnel or transportation of the victim to the hospital


AIMS & OBJECTIVES OF FIRST AID

1. Preserve life

2. Save life with the application of A B C (i.e. Airway, Breathing, and Compression)

3. To prevent an illness or injury from becoming worse

4. To promote recovery by relieving pain as far as possible.

5. To provide reassurance and comfort to the casualty

YOU AS FIRST RESPONDER/ FIRST AIDER

1. What is the purpose of first aid?

The main purpose of first aid as stated earlier is to preserve life, prevent the condition from getting worse and promote recovery

2. How do we recognize emergencies?

Look for sign that we can see or the patient will tell us of symptoms he may be experiencing i.e. headache, shortness of breath, dizziness, chest pain etc.

3. How do we assess an emergency scene?

What sort of emergency is it? (Medical, fire, chemical exposure, explosion or accident). Are there any hazards on the scene? Is the scene safe for me to go to the patients?

4. How many patients are there?

Where am I? Is there help nearby (shout for help)Is there a good access and exit route?

5. What information can I get from the patient if he is conscious?

Ask him if he knows what happened? Does he have any pains? Is he allergic to anything? Does he have a medical history? Is he taking any medication? Did he eatbefore the accident? How is he feeling? If patients is unconscious look for signs of life i.e. breathing, swallowing, chest rising, abdominal movement, feel for pulse.

QUALITIES OF A GOOD FIRST AIDER

1. Must have the necessary knowledge

2. Have common sense

3. Have the ability to act quickly, make decision and improvise

4. Have perseverance to continue to try in the face of difficulties

5. Have sympathy, empathy and understanding

RULES GUIDING FIRST AIDER

1. Be calm: Do not panic.

2. Apply common sense: Most cases use your discretion depending on the prevailing situation especially where the first aider and the victim may be exposed to further danger.

3. Do not attempt to do too much if you are unsure of what to do.

4. Reassure victims all the time. This can be demonstrated by words of encouragement.

5. Do not remove victim unless absolutely necessary; that is when the victim is exposed to further danger.

6. Do not allow people to crowd around you.

7. Do not have the victim unattended until the doctor or trained medical professional takes charge.

8. Loosen any tight or restricted clothing around the neck and waist to allow easy breathing and blood circulation. Upon approaching the scene, quickly take in as much information as possible and take into consideration the principles D R S A B C D

D – Danger: Always presume that there is some danger, so check for it and deal with any danger to yourself; the victim and by standers e.g. traffic, electricity, infection from body fluid etc.

R – Response: Check for response by talking and asking question and shaking victims shoulder gently.

S – Shout: The first aider must shout for help when there is no response and he is alone with the victim.

A – Airway: Casualty must have a clear and unobstructed airway to be able to survive and maintain an open airway by tilting the head back while placing two fingers to lift the chin.

B – Breathing: Check for up to 10 seconds for breathing, if breathing but unconscious place in the recovery position, this will help to maintain an open airway but if not breathing, start compression at once.

C – Compression: Commence chest compression immediately when casualty is not breathing at the ratio of 3 compression to two breaths (C P R).

D- Defibrillator: A medium used to bring back the heart to its normal rhythm.

For more info and training on this course,visit www.deslogenergy.com/hsetraining

Or Call 07035612321

HSE OIL AND GAS EMPLOYMENT TRAINING

 

A Career in the Oil and gas industry is a special one with high rewards.
To enjoy its benefit,appropriate training is required to secure its access.
Training such as :

HSE Level 1,2 & 3
Medic First Aid AED & CPR
Oil & Gas Document Control

is required for such.

TOTAL COST IMPLICATION (No Hidden Charges)

Registration Fee: 5,000

Course Materials & Lunch Fee: 5,000

Certification Fee: 50,000

Date:

Lagos Mon. 17th – Sat. 22nd July / Mon. 31st July – Sat. 5th Aug

Port Harcourt Mon. 17th – Sat. 22nd July /Mon. 31st July – Sat. 5th Aug

Abuja Mon. 3rd – Sat. 8th July /Mon. 31st July – Sat. 5th Aug

Ibadan Mon. 10th – Sat. 15th July
Uyo Mon. 10th – Sat. 15th July
Warri Mon. 10th – Sat. 15th July
Enugu Mon. 10th – Sat. 15th July

All participants who make complete payment on or before the last day of the training will be registered as an associate member of World safety Organization (W S O) 100% free(the current value for W S O Associate membership is 55USD).

Note: This membership will give you an edge over your competitors in the labour market who may only have the certificates but do not have membership with any recognized international body.

Job consultation & Assistance is Free

Assistance on CV packaging is Free

First 5 people to register for this training in any of the batches and make complete payment before the commencement date will get one International Safety Passport (ISP) from our partner in Dubai 100% free. The current value for International Safety Passport is 150Dirham

Pls note: courses taken for this training can be used for industries other than the oil and gas such as telecoms, aviation and anywhere safety is required for operation.

For more info,visit www.deslogenergy.com/hsetraining or call:

08031883143
08137477086
07033847973
07035612321

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